This is my personal tumblr. Mostly sparse postings. Occasional meat and sarcasm.

 

ween1984:

vexednature:

politicalsexkitten:

not-your-cute-little-asian-girl:

So I saw this message in my inbox and wasn’t sure if Mae knew enough mandarin to reply to this, so I thought I’d copy and paste it to google translate just to try to see if I could get a couple of words in and understand what this ask was about.

But lol. Oh boy. As someone who speaks four languages, google translate is shit. Ask any bilingual. And to see this translated so. damn. perfectly. is hilarious.

You literally went to google translate, typed out what you wanted to say, put the Chinese option, and copy and pasted it into our inbox.

Then you say “you cannot say I’m white cause I’m writing this in China” like lol that is the whitest thing you can say.

And another thing, the wording on your post. You try and simplify and condense your words and sentencing because it might not translate well if you use other synonyms in English to Chinese.

Good lord. Even with proper grammar from someone who’s fluent in another language, google translate is crap. There is no fucking way that it can translate this so perfectly without originating from google translate itself.

So whitey, mayo, cracker, try again.

-Leah

This is way too funny oh my god

oh god this is legit hilar + as a person who understands chinese i can say with 268437% certainty that it’s translated from english, the sentence structure and everything is completely wrong. it’s obv a direct translation from english (ahem i know from my experience writing chinese compos w the help of google translate).

so many gems in the message but i think the one that takes the cake is when he writes 比赛 to mean the (Asian) race because LOL THAT MEANS RACE AS IN COMPETITION IN CHINESE NOT RACE AS IN ASIAN 

  我不白 is not how u say i’m not white. 

Oh my god

Mom's Photo Series Spotlights Racist Comments Directed at Daughters

amazing-how-you-love:

"Questions and comments directed at both mom and daughters have ranged from combative to misguided. Some that Kelley-Wagner remembers include, "They hate girls from the country you come from — you know that, right?" "Why don’t you look like your mom?" "Your mom is a real saint for wanting you" "What a China doll!" "But what are her emotional issues?" and "Why would you bring more immigrants into our country?" 

“One time, I was at the mechanic and the counter guy said to one of the girls, ‘You know that’s not your real sister, right?’” Kelley-Wagner recounts. “His coworker rushed over and apologized for him. On another occasion, a bookstore clerk asked, ‘Um, does she look like her real father?’”

Some see the project as exploitative. “Yesterday, a woman online said that my project was a parental fail,” says Kelley-Wagner. “But I want my kids to be aware of the ignorance in the world so they’ll know how to handle it.” She admits that it can be hard for her to stay calm at times; she doesn’t want her children to respond rudely but instead to make the other person think. “My advice to them is, leave your offenders speechless,” she says. Liliana is learning — recently, a couple approached the family and the woman remarked, “I couldn’t love someone I didn’t give birth to,” to which Lily cleverly responded, “Oh, did you give birth to your husband?” before walking away. “I was proud of her,” says Kelley-Wagner.

She doesn’t believe that people are being purposefully cruel; she thinks that in most cases it’s simply ignorance. “I think people are curious and don’t know any better,” she says. “Fortunately, my daughters have never questioned their place in our family or felt out of place.””

Let’s face it, none of those comments would be hurled at white children.  To call it well-intentioned “ignorance” shows how white people think racism is essentially harmless — and that it’s up to the child to make it a teaching moment.  Meanwhile white kids are kids until they die to the detriment of the rest of the world. 

allerasphinx:

theatlantic:

The Incoherent Backlash to Black Actors Playing ‘White’ Superheroes

Michael B. Jordan has been cast as Johnny Storm in the new Fantastic Four movie. For many prospective viewers, that announcement will raise the question that any announcement of a Michael B. Jordan movie raises: Will he be shirtless, and for how much screen time? Other superhero fans, though, are distracted by less wholesome concerns. Johnny Storm, they have noticed, is white. Michael B. Jordan is black. How, they wonder, can this be?
The outcry over interracial casting here appears to be much more muted than the stir over Idris Elba’s role as Heimdall in the Thor franchise, which provoked boycott threats. Still, I’ve seen people on Twitter talking about how the casting will “ruin” the franchise. I’m not going to link because I’m leery of shaming people that way on a mainstream site, but if you look around you can find them without too much trouble. (Niki Cruz has rounded up some of the response, with names redacted, here.) This echoes earlier controversies in which a campaign to get Donald Glover cast as Spider-Man met with racially fraught backlash, while the casting of Amandla Stenberg as Rue in The Hunger Games provoked angry social media whining.
Read more. [Image: John Shearer / AP; Adi Granov / Marvel]




 Why is Rue from THG included when she’s black in the books?

he’s contrasting the two situations.  When it’s a white character (Spidey) the mere suggestion that he be played by a black actor draws backlash, but when it’s a black character the character gets shit for being played by a black actor (Rue) so real white and other non-blackmoviegoers are just pushing back against the presence of black characters at all.  Anti blackness.

allerasphinx:

theatlantic:

The Incoherent Backlash to Black Actors Playing ‘White’ Superheroes

Michael B. Jordan has been cast as Johnny Storm in the new Fantastic Four movie. For many prospective viewers, that announcement will raise the question that any announcement of a Michael B. Jordan movie raises: Will he be shirtless, and for how much screen time? Other superhero fans, though, are distracted by less wholesome concerns. Johnny Storm, they have noticed, is white. Michael B. Jordan is black. How, they wonder, can this be?

The outcry over interracial casting here appears to be much more muted than the stir over Idris Elba’s role as Heimdall in the Thor franchise, which provoked boycott threats. Still, I’ve seen people on Twitter talking about how the casting will “ruin” the franchise. I’m not going to link because I’m leery of shaming people that way on a mainstream site, but if you look around you can find them without too much trouble. (Niki Cruz has rounded up some of the response, with names redacted, here.) This echoes earlier controversies in which a campaign to get Donald Glover cast as Spider-Man met with racially fraught backlash, while the casting of Amandla Stenberg as Rue in The Hunger Games provoked angry social media whining.

Read more. [Image: John Shearer / AP; Adi Granov / Marvel]

Why is Rue from THG included when she’s black in the books?

he’s contrasting the two situations. When it’s a white character (Spidey) the mere suggestion that he be played by a black actor draws backlash, but when it’s a black character the character gets shit for being played by a black actor (Rue) so real white and other non-blackmoviegoers are just pushing back against the presence of black characters at all. Anti blackness.

ladymakomori asked
ohh so im still v confused if east asian grrls like me are part of brown girls?

irresistible-revolution:

i think so! i mean it’s about a commonality of oppression and shared radicalized status. i usually include east-asian girls when i think/say Brown

I referred to myself as brown once and got some eye rolls from other women of color. I don’t know. I am part Austronesian but mostly pass as East Asian. Probably brown by East Asian standards but not as seriously affected by colorism or shadeism as other WoC. I don’t know.

Anonymous asked
Honestly the white guilt you're trying to put on everyone for how bad Native Americans have it isn't worth it. My great grandfather came to the U.S. with a couple bucks in his pocket and a pregnant wife, and he managed to build a life and work his way up to owning a successful business. He dealt with racism just like everyone else, but he didn't complain about it. Your life could be worse. Don't guilt people into feeling bad about things that happened in the past.

anndruyan:

My great grandfather was murdered in front of his son because he told a big successful company in San Diego they couldn’t have his land. It was rightfully his land, he lived on it, he built a house for his family on it, he grew crops, he raised animals; he was a successful Kumeyaay man.

His children were then split apart and put into the boarding schools, his wife was sent to Mexico and all record of her disappears. The youngest child was adopted into a white family, further erasing my culture and language, and the son that watched the men from the Edison company stab his father to death was sent to a reform school up in Northern California where he was killed by the kids within 6 months of his arrival. His remains are still at the school and will never be returned home for proper burial. The other remaining kids were split among the reservations, which has caused some of my cousins to not learn my language, while some have learned the northern dialect and further causes a contradiction within our oral history and makes communication harder.

Further more 1 in 3 Native women will be sexually assaulted in her life. I’d like to point out (since you’re so upset by my white guilt) that most sexual assaults on Native women are performed by non-Natives. We also have a high rate of domestic violence, which is a direct result from the boarding school system in which the founding motto was “Kill the Indian, save the Man”, and was to reform all Native children in the system to act and behave like whites. Prior to the boarding schools there was no form of physical punishment within my tribe.

Did your great grandfather deal with this kind of racism? Did he deal with colonialism that ripped his land away from him, literally beat his native tongue out of him, took his culture, and forced his tribe into slavery to build a Mission? Did he have his stories passed down from many, many generations by skilled story tellers only to be replaced by Catholicism or Christianity? Were his children taken from him and put into schools to be beaten until civilized? Does your family now live on left over land that is virtually impossible to live on, while white people still squat on portions of it?

Does your ethnicity get misrepresented by media causing your own country to only believe racist caricatures of your people? Is your collective culture still disrespected after 500 years of survival by bratty little teenagers who think “Native culture” is beautiful? And when you speak up about it do white people tell you to stop complaining?

Do you have representation in government? (We hardly do) Does your country recognize your rights and that your people still exist? Is your history in your textbooks?

My life could definitely be worse, and I’m fortunate it’s not. Despite being a victim of abuse, seeing my friends kill themselves over racism and apathy, having gone to multiple funerals before I was 15, get picked on all throughout school because of how poor I was or how dirty I sometimes showed up, have children call my family lazy drunks, go to a now-reformed boarding school where I got to see headstones of my family, I have a good life.

But don’t you ever compare your great grandfather’s racism to my family’s. Because chances are your great grandfather was never murdered because society thought he was less than human.

I’m not here to push white guilt on people, and I do my best not to put blame on the entire world’s population of white people or say I hate them. My reasons for posting videos and photos and articles of the racism and ignorance we deal with to this day is to open at least someone’s eyes that we still exist and the cultural genocide is still not over. If you feel like I’m pushing white guilt on you, then take a moment to think about why you feel guilty.

The amazing posts that /r/tumblrinaction is too chicken shit to post.

hold up

thisislucreziasand:

ppl r calling GRRM racist over the white savior complex in dany’s story?

REALLY?

funny.

i thought it might’ve been the anti-black comments and flat out dismissive treatment of his fans of color during the martell casting fiasco.

or the vehement defending and limp dick justification of the racist as fuck mhysa scene.

or the ~*gift*~ of the cinnamon wind that all POC fans should weep for joy over cause YAY DIVERSITY! THANK U WHITE MAN!

NOPE..not THAT.

just the imperialistic nature of dany’s storyline that, with recent events, is looking more like GRRM actually thinks that shit is ok. but of course, if he was interested in mitigating that notion we would have a POV in essos that didnt belong to the high “civilized” whites of westeros. but we dont have that…do we…?

but whatever, dont mind me, carry on.

he needs to read more books.

Chinese like You: White Adoptive Mothers and the Reality of Racial Privilege | Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture

thisisnotchina:

By Guest Contributor Sara Erdmann

Despite the fact that international adoption has become commonplace — most recent studies show that over 70,000 Chinese girls were adopted into the United States between 1991 and 2010 — Beth Nonte Russell’s path to motherhood was a nontraditional one. In her 2007 memoir, Forever Lily: an Unexpected Mother’s Journey to Adoption, Russell describes accompanying a friend who intends to adopt on a trip to China.

This book, while almost 7 years old, is continuously recommended across the web for adoptive mothers — it’s pinned on Pinterest and a regular on the book club circuit. In an era obsessed with memoir, it seems only natural that Russell would choose to chronicle her journey as such, particularly considering the major surprise (read: book sales) that characterizes her trip: Russell’s friend changes her mind. Quickly becoming the heroine of her own story, Russell looks down at the little girl she has only just met and begins conceiving a history in which the two of them were meant to be together. Eager to substantiate her sudden role as Lily’s mother, Russell proclaims that “there was a past life connection between [her] and Lily,” and that her “longing brought [Lily] into being.” To suggest that this child living in an orphanage in China exists because Russell willed her into being is problematic to say the least, but Russell goes one step further in her desire to feel permanently and unalterably connected despite her and Lily’s cultural and racial differences.

White adoptive families are regularly challenged by the idea of incorporating their child’s birth culture into their family. Researchers have long questioned whether an adopted child’s birth culture should be ignored, as in cases when families essentially raise their child of color as white, or whether it should be embraced, even to the point of trying to mimic a Chinese upbringing in the United States (think Chinese New Year parties and Mandarin lessons). In Racial Formation in the United States: From the 1960s to the 1990s, sociologists Michael Omi and Howard Winant observe that “there is a continuous temptation to think of race as an essence, as something fixed, concrete, and objective. And there is also an opposite temptation: to imagine race as a mere illusion, a purely ideological construct which some ideal non-racist social order would eliminate.” Because Russell sees Lily’s race as an essence, something unalterable, and she needs to feel she was meant to be Lily’s mother, she relies on personal epiphanies and memories that confirm that, in some way, she is also Chinese.

Upon her return to the United States with Lily, Russell talks with her sister who recalls that, during a family trip to San Francisco’s Chinatown years ago, Russell awoke in the middle of the night, waving her arms around and saying something about a baby. Russell’s sister said she was quite scared and that “she was sure [Russell] was speaking Chinese.” From this story, Russell’s sister concludes that she “always knew [Russell] was Chinese.” Russell is immediately validated:

A chill of recognition rippled over me as she spoke those words, and I thought, Yes, I am Chinese. […] I forget at times that when [the Chinese] look at me, they see someone different, someone separate; and when I remember that, it feels like a betrayal.

Because Russell had a dream after a family trip to Chinatown, and later fell in love with a Chinese baby girl, she is now Chinese. Yet, Lily, who was born in China, is Chinese as well. Lily, who will be raised in the United States and likely know no more of China than any other tourist, will remain Chinese no matter what. It is never considered that Lily will be entirely American, because the idea that someone crosses national borders and loses their “ethnic heritage” is no longer accepted. Yet, what Russell fails to acknowledge is the fact that, if Lily is unalterably Chinese, Russell is unalterably white. To allow herself a flexible ethnicity implies that Lily’s racial essence conflicts with Russell’s racial illusion: in other words, one can add Asianness to whiteness, but not the other way around.

Much as maleness is considered the blank slate of sex, whiteness is essentially a racial blank slate to most Americans. In Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination, Toni Morrison articulates the problematic tendency to portray whiteness as “‘universal’ or race-free.” Morrison describes a character from a Hemingway novel who we know is white “because nobody says so.” In other words, whiteness is what we assume when given no other information, and anything else is a shift to non-white, or raced. This mentality of white people as “race-free” is pervasive among white Americans and is a large part of the adoptive community’s tendency to see little girls born in China as unalterably Chinese while their adoptive parents’ identities are more flexible. (Of course, this mutable identity is not allowed to Chinese women, who, when they choose to go by American names for professional reasons, sadden Russell. She projects that these women “cannot be who they really are with us; they must alter their identities in an attempt to bridge the cultural gap […]. It must be a strain to do so.”)

In the recent past, it was acceptable to pretend adopted Chinese daughters were no different from white biological children: colorblindness was the politically correct stance. Only twenty years ago Morrison wrote that “the habit of ignoring race is understood by most to be a graceful, even generous, liberal gesture.” In other words, to ignore someone’s race was considered an act of benevolence. Today, with a trend toward multiculturalism and a fascination with the exotic, the idea that these young girls cross the border and immediately become “American” is both outdated and unfashionable.

No longer do parents pick up their adopted children at the airport, give them American names, and imagine they have lived here all along; as Toby Alice Volkman observes in Cultures of Transnational Adoption, no longer is “racial assimilation the goal.” When Russell is going through the final stages of bringing her daughter home from China, she describes her discomfort with the name her friend had originally chosen:

It is a quintessentially American name, and would have given no hint or nod to [the baby’s] Asian roots. It is a label, an American label that would have been slapped over the MADE IN CHINA label that was Baby herself, in an attempt to obscure the truth.

In Russell’s mind, Lily is Chinese regardless of what her future brings, so much so that Russell imagines a physical label on Lily’s body. Indeed, Russell ends up choosing the name Lily, which apparently hints at her “Asian roots” (despite its Latin origin and immense popularity in English-speaking countries). Anthropologist Barbara Yngvesson acknowledges in Cultures of Transnational Adoption that, while children aren’t free-standing, nor are they necessarily rooted. She counters the pervasive myth that an adopted child “naturally” belongs somewhere, and yet she is simultaneously adamant that there is no such thing as a motherless child. Like Omi and Winant, she sees two extremes that adoptive parents cling to, unable to find the balance that exists in between.

Russell, like many mothers, adopts both extremes: her daughter’s race is permanent, hers is not, and thus they can be joined by her own transition to a Chinese identity. Vincent Cheng’s Inauthentic: The Anxiety over Culture and Identity notes how this fascination with (or fetishization of) Asian culture leads many adoptive parents to dress their daughters “in clothes they had bought in China and decorate her room with artwork from her homeland.” It leads to families who are “not only learning to cook Chinese at home but are learning Mandarin in order to speak Chinese to a little girl who was probably never able to speak it to begin with.”

This enthusiastic adoption of Chinese culture excites many white mothers and provides them with the connection they desire: Volkman cites “one white adoptive mother [who] laughed as she described how a highly educated Chinese American friend sought her advice on books about things Chinese for his young children.” It seems as though this woman considers herself more authentically “Chinese” than her Chinese-American friend. Like Russell, many adoptive parents are determined to provide Chinese culture for their children, even if it means learning to make mooncakes, a Chinese food that most Chinese people never cook themselves (how many Americans make their own bagels?), or replacing family trips to the aquarium with Chinese culture excursions.

While the desire for connection is understandable, this identification leaves Chinese adoptees that much more isolated, simply because their mothers actually appear white and thus benefit from white privilege adoptees can’t access. Whether being teased for whatCultures of Transnational Adoption calls “small noses, flat faces, yellow skin, or short eyelashes,” Chinese children are tempted to seek solace from their parents. Yet, in response to this, one adoptive mother asks, “What can I say to her? I speak with long eyelashes.” This one acknowledgment, it seems, is what Russell never accepts, and what many white adoptive parents so desperately need to hear in their quest for information about parenting children of color.

The desire of an adoptive mother to see herself as her child’s ethnicity in order to better relate to the child is not unique to Russell, nor do I intend to use her as the scapegoat for all white adoptive mothers struggling with the realities of race. Indeed, many more memoirs have been written about adoption, and Russell’s is not the only one to make dubious claims about race, nor the only suspect text that swims around in the adoptive parent circuit.

For Russell to see herself as Chinese, she may be creating what she believes is a closer connection to her daughter, but what it comes down to is that no amount of imagination will rid Russell of her privilege as a white woman. Inevitably left behind in this discussion are girls like Lily, who are never asked whether they prefer Catholicism, Thanksgiving, and Irish step dance to Buddhism, the Chinese New Year, and gymnastics (did I mention Russell also becomes Buddhist?). They are not allowed to grow up as they are, a product of two cultures. As she grows older, Lily may be unaware of the debate surrounding cultural assimilation, but she has the unique perspective of an adopted child whose mother’s identity as a white woman seems to have been replaced by hers.

So book groups beware: insofar as transracial adoptive parents can find answers to what is best for their children, it is not Russell’s voice but the voices of those who are adopted, those who are the subject of this continuous debate, that deserve our undivided attention.

locsgirl:

anecdotesofmylife:

Watched Princess Ka’Iulani a few weeks ago. The movie was worth watching. 
A story about the short life of Princess Ka’iulani, the last princess of the Kingdom of Hawaii, who fought for her people’s rights to vote and own land during the time of the imposition of the Bayonet Consititution.
Born Victoria Ka’iulani Kalaninuihilapalapa Kawekiu i Lunalilo Cleghorn, niece to King Kalakaua and proclaimed crown princess to the Kingdom of Hawaii, Princess Ka’iulani was sent to England by her Scottish father to pursue her education. It was during this time that Hawaii was thrown into turmoil which eventually resulted to the overthrow of the Hawawii monarchy. Although young and inexperienced in the matters of state and politics, Princess Ka’iulani, in service to her people and fighting for her right to the throne, travelled to America to plead her country’s case. Princess Ka’iulani is honored throughout Hawaii as their beloved Ali’i and has been inspiring generations of Na Kanaka Maoli for years. 
The film has some boring moments but overall, it was a good film worth watching especially for someone who is interested on history and royalty of Hawaii. 


I want to see it. 

Except the film makers aside no Native Hawaiian actresses were talented enough to play this role…

locsgirl:

anecdotesofmylife:

Watched Princess Ka’Iulani a few weeks ago. The movie was worth watching. 

A story about the short life of Princess Ka’iulani, the last princess of the Kingdom of Hawaii, who fought for her people’s rights to vote and own land during the time of the imposition of the Bayonet Consititution.

Born Victoria Ka’iulani Kalaninuihilapalapa Kawekiu i Lunalilo Cleghorn, niece to King Kalakaua and proclaimed crown princess to the Kingdom of Hawaii, Princess Ka’iulani was sent to England by her Scottish father to pursue her education. It was during this time that Hawaii was thrown into turmoil which eventually resulted to the overthrow of the Hawawii monarchy. Although young and inexperienced in the matters of state and politics, Princess Ka’iulani, in service to her people and fighting for her right to the throne, travelled to America to plead her country’s case. Princess Ka’iulani is honored throughout Hawaii as their beloved Ali’i and has been inspiring generations of Na Kanaka Maoli for years. 

The film has some boring moments but overall, it was a good film worth watching especially for someone who is interested on history and royalty of Hawaii. 

I want to see it. 

Except the film makers aside no Native Hawaiian actresses were talented enough to play this role…

Some facts about figure skating because that Surya Bonaly post is bullshit but I doubt anyone will read this

bethelionqueen:

  • Surya Bonaly represented France. France has not had very many good skaters
  • She was not artistic. She just wasn’t.
  • She was good, but not that consistent
  • People who watched figure skating then knew who Surya Bonaly was.
  • She’s not some remarkable figure in history.
  • Most people don’t know shit about figure skating, especially competitors from other countries.
  • In 1998 and 1994, most of us were toddlers or not born
  • The scoring system was biased though and ended in 2002. So there could have been some racism/bias
  • You see there was a scandal in which people found out that judges were being bribed
  • She didn’t win the Olympics because it’s the Olympics and it’s not about being black, it’s about how you skate and she made mistakes whilst the meddlers skated perfectly. Instead of taking someone’s word, why don’t you actually watch the event. 
  • Doing a backflip disqualifies you from a competition
  • Other skaters can do backflips but she was the first to land it on one foot.
  • She retired because she was old and after awhile, you just are done with it, especially after a second Olympic try.
  • She also is the only woman to land an under-rotated quad toe loop. So she is not credited with a clean one. Neither is anyone who “cheats” a jump.
  • In 2002, Miki Ando landed a clean quad salchow
  • Anyone can skate
  • But many African Americans simply don’t. I coach and I’ve noticed very few black students.
  • They are not barred in any way from participating so that’s on them.
  • The sport is mainly dominated by asians, then russians, then caucasians
  • Figure Skating is expensive
  • Do you know who Tara Lipinski is? If not, shut the fuck up, you just don’t know figure skating.

This is sad but kind of terrible ironic funny.

"Anyone can skate.  But many Africans simply don’t.  I coach and I’ve noticed very few black students.  They are not barred in any way from participating so that’s on them.  The sport is mainly dominated by asians, then russians, then caucasians.  Figure skating is expensive."

Much unconscious racism.  Such unwilling to notice bias.

I mean you know your major network television show is doing *the most* when there is literally ONE white person in the main group of players and FIVE PoC

allerasarcophagus:

drdoccubustorres:

Okay, two, if you count Katrina but she’s not quite so visible.

This is also how you know who to side eye if there’s an entire cast of poc, and they’re only stanning for the white people, one of whom isn’t very visible.

From the network that brought you DADS eff this bullshit.

(Source: drtessarosetorres)